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TYBA's meetings

Last month

  1. Online meeting with the Covid admin about AYQ.
  2. Online meeting with the Commercial Marine subcommittee if the Thai Chamber of Commerce (every 2 month).
  3. Online meeting with the Marine Tourism subcommittee of the Senate (every week on Monday afternoon).
  4. Meeting with the Ministry of Finance about a new custom announcement.
  5. Meeting with the Thai Custom about a new custom announcement.
  6. Meeting with the Office of the National Economic and Social Development Council (Khun Ditapong attend this in Phuket)

Interview with Paul Stamp

Multihull Solution

Contact Paul STAMP at the following number: + 66 (0)91 824 7966
or visit the website: www.multihullsolutions.asia

Latest News

Fez & Phoenix grab top spots in 24th Bay Regatta

Simon James and Kae Wattana of Regattas Asia did what few people in this region have done: stage two major regattas throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Co-operating with local health authorities the 24th Bay Regatta, and second Bay Regatta since the novel coronavirus outbreak, set sail April 1st from Ao Po Grand Marina.

The Bay Regatta is a series of passage races – an event format that catches the attention of the region’s best sailors as they competed in two classes, Racing Multihulls and Monohulls with a cruising multi (Mojo) thrown in for good measure.

This four-day circumnavigation of Phang Nga Bay focuses on fun. Attracting the serious, the not-so-serious and the not-at-all-serious “racing” sailors, the regatta appeals to those who enjoy the stunning sailing grounds of the area and a different destination each evening.

Each evening, the regatta anchors at a different venue and the sailors go ashore. Those staying ashore –the majority of the fleet – book accommodation and either eat in the local restaurants or enjoy the official event functions which engage with the local community. Most of the expenditure of the regatta goes directly into the local economies of the areas the regatta visits — this has been the case since the regatta was launched and it will remain so for the future — an excellent example of how sports tourism works to the benefit of communities and local economies.

John Coffin’s Fez pulled the surprise of the regatta winning the five-boat Multihull Racing Class with John Newnham’s Twin Sharks coming in second. Twin Sharks had a man overboard on day two, which saw them lose valuable time and finish fourth, which would hurt them later in the overall standings, though thank God crewmate Ken Wottawa was alright (a big shout out to Grenville Fordham who was crewing on Coconuts as they were hot on the heels of Twin Sharks as he managed to alert his squad to avert as Wottawa hit the water).

Dan Fidock’s Fugazi had line honours throughout the regatta but handicap saw them settle for third overall. Alan Carwardine’s Coconuts never recovered from their DNF on the first day and settled for fount overall, while Glywn Rowlands’ Twister 2 took fifth-place in the class. Multihull Performance saw the order shift as follows: Twin Sharks, Fugazi, Fez, Coconuts, Twister 2 & Mojo.

Niels Diegenklow and Phoenix rode three first-place finishes to victory in the four-boat IRC monohull class allowing the Dane to win this class for the umpteenth time in the Bay Regatta. Fellow Dane Torben Kristienson’s Kinnon was third and it was only Andrew McDermott’s Jessandra, who was able to take a spot away from Phoenix at the top of the podium winning day two of the regatta, allowing them to finish second overall in the class. Paul Merry’s Night Train was fourth. Overall results were the same for the class in the Monohull Performance division.

While Rick Fielding’s Mojo did not finish high in the standings Fielding did show great sportsmanship in ferrying all of Jessandra’s crew to shore safely in his dinghy when they stuck in the channel outside Port Takola. He was honoured by PRO Simon James with a bottle of port in memory of the late Marty Rijurkis who made a habit of highlighting good deeds people would perform during regattas. (Port Takola Marina kindly hosted the regatta boats for two nights during the regatta).

Fourth Sailor’s Regatta takes to the water

The fourth annual Sailor’s Regatta organized by the Phuket Yacht Club took sail from March 19th – March 21st with racers competing in four different classes (Racing Monohulls, Multihulls & Platus).

This “no frills” regatta continues to be popular with local sailors, many of whom have been hit hard by the coronavirus. It was almost a year ago that Thailand sealed off its international borders and a few days of fun on the water off of Ao Chalong was a much-needed respite and boost of confidence for club members.

John Newnham’s Twin Sharks edged out Warwick Downes’ Bonza in the prestigious Multihull Racing Class to close out the regatta. The crews finished tied on points (15) but Twin Sharks has more overall victories in the three-day series (three to two) to claim the title. So Newnham’s crew of Olly Wilce, Alf Rowson, and Jason Corall triumphed again despite being a sailor short.

Bonza never fails to draw oohs and aahs in their hull-flying and it was no different in this regatta as the trimaran raced around capturing line honours time and time again. Alan Carwardine’s Coconuts, Hans Rahmann’s Voodoo and the Scott Duncanson-helmed Fugazi rounded out the class finishing in that order.

Alfie Rowson, who recently came out of quarantine after returning from his native Scotland, gave credit to the Race Committee for modifying the courses as the regatta went on responding to the fluctuating wind conditions and directions.

Niels Degenkolw’s Phoenix won all but one race in the four-boat Monohull division capturing the class title followed by Andrew McDermott Jessandra who earned the only other victory in the series. Mike Downard’s Magic finished third and Martyn Henman’s Second Nature finished last with a DNS on race four.

Paul “Flatty” Baker’s four first-place finishes in Pulse Grey enabled Paul and his wife to take the three-boat Cruising Multihull title over Bill Kane’s The Sting and Pulse Red skipped by Simon Boyd, who also sailed with his partner in the regatta.

The Platu division could have been called the “Sail in Asia” division as all three Platus came from Mike Downard’s fleet over in nearby Ao Yon.  Kirsten Durward’s Wolf had four first-place finishes and five second-place finishes to capture the division. Brooke Palmer’s Tiger was second and Jon Oeygard’s The Fox came third, after switching boats after race day one.

Credit to the PYC for staging for staging the event, and PRO Matt McGrath for making sure it ran smoothly.

FRASER Phuket signs on Demarest & Maxxx

“FRASER Phuket, operated under license by Asia Marine, has recently signed on two super yachts as Central Agent. Under charter, Demarest, a stunning 105ft Falcon yacht, will be operating overnight charters from Phuket. Under brokerage, Maxxx, a 86ft Sunseeker is now for sale and represents great value for prospective buyers.

East Marine Asia has all your anti-fouling needs

Antifouling, it’s a very important product when it comes to taking care of your boat, but it can have a harmful and deadly effect on sea life. Ian Lok, East Marine Asia’s Sales Manager, says that while people are much more aware of the rubbish they throw in the sea these days antifouling is one of the most toxic substances we put in our oceans and by using improperly mixed antifouling many people in the marine industry are causing more damage to the oceans than they know. As Ian says, any solution designed to remove barnacles from your hull is going to have a toxic make-up.  And the main catalyst in early anti-fouling mixtures was Tributyltin “TBT” a toxic biocide that was extremely effective at cleaning hulls but toxic to the environment and has now been banned.

Wikipedia states, “Tributyltin (TBT) is an umbrella term for a class of organotin compounds which contain the (C4H9)3 Sn group, with a prominent example being tributyltin oxide. For 40 years TBT was used as a biocide in anti-fouling paint, commonly known as bottom paint, applied to the hulls of ocean going vessels. Bottom paint improves ship performance and durability as it reduces the rate of biofouling (the growth of organisms on the ship’s hull). The TBT slowly leaches out into the marine environment where it is highly toxic toward nontarget organisms. TBT is also an obesogen. After it led to collapse of local populations of organisms, TBT was banned.”

There are still shops today that buy and sell TBT as a chemical compound to add to anti-fouling paint. But not only will this foul the environment, if you screw up the mixing ratio, the paint will not adhere to the hull properly. Be very careful of shady contractors that offer you a great price on antifouling.

Yacht-based antifouling tends to be more environmentally-friendly than commercial antifouling, which is designed for offshore ships, ferries and craft that are mainly used offshore with constant medium to high speed. Commercial antifouling is generally a much cheaper coating due to the chemical costs used to produce the product.

Yacht antifoulings are more self polishing and softer. This allows better growth control while not moving, and while underway. As most yachts spend more time stationary on moorings, marinas and hardstands, International yacht antifouling uses Biolux® technology in a variety of their antifouling to give the highest performance with the environment in mind.

With antifouling itself, there are two kinds: hard and eroding as described by International Yacht Paint (AkzoNobel) below:

Hard antifoulings work by releasing biocide from the surface of the coating to deter fouling organisms. Hard antifoulings don’t really wear, but abrasive material in the water such as silt and sand may lead to a very minor reduction in the film build. Biocide leaching rate reduces over the lifetime of the product. After a few seasons, there may be a residual build-up of product that needs to be removed. If you have a fast boat, or a fast boat that is used very regularly, then hard antifouling is usually the best product to choose. Boats moored in fresh water normally use these types as eroding antifoulings are designed to erode in salt water and may not erode sufficiently in fresh water. For those who like to race, hard products are a good option as they can be burnished or wet sanded to a smooth finish prior to racing. Within this group there is type that contains a fluoro micro-additive to help provide a smoother faster film than a standard hard type might otherwise provide. This is favoured by keen racing types who place more importance on keeping their hulls smooth and clean rather than its antifouling performance.

Eroding antifoulings, also known as soft or ablative antifoulings, also work by releasing biocide. However, this type of over antifouling slowly erodes in seawater eventually leaving little or no antifouling on your hull. If you wipe the hull at any time you’ll see a small cloud of product washing away. Overall, they offer very good all-round performance in a wide range of fouling conditions. Eroding antifoulings are great for those who prefer a low maintenance option, as generally speaking there is far less accumulation of old paint on the hull after each season. However, a slow build up can still occur if excessive paint is applied at each application. This will eventually need to be removed as it may become unstable and lead to problems when new antifouling is applied.

To get more information on what antifouling is best for you, drop in to East Marine Asia’s chandlery at Boat Lagoon Phuket, or contact Ian at [email protected]

Other East Marine Asia Green Initiatives

East Marine Asia is no longer providing plastic bags. The company has launched a campaign whereby you get Bt20 off any purchase over Bt200 if you are bring in an East Marine Asia eco-bag to carry away your purchases.

The company is also trying to get customers to start using electronic catalogues and do their browsing online to get away from using paper catalogues.

East Marine Asia is doing its best but it is dealing with an industry that produces so much waste. The use of bubble wrap alone is a major concern, so the company is experimenting with bio-degradable bubble wrap. And in the future, it will also use only recycled/compostable packaging material for its shipping needs.

The company also aims to minimize the number of paper receipts and invoices it issues, unless specifically requested by the customer. It will begin emailing out the invoices and receipts instead.

www. eastmarineasia.com

Galileo Maritime Academy Introductory Maritime Courses

Galileo Maritime Academy is proud to announce the launch of a new range of introductory courses taught by professional, internationally certified instructors at their world class training facility located in Phuket Yacht Haven Marina.

As a professional seafarer training facility providing international qualifications for crew to work on board large vessels, Galileo understands that there are also those who lack experience and basic skills necessary to be able to take the most away from their MCA and Superyacht Career Entry courses.

So they have developed the following courses to help new entrants to the maritime industry familiarise themselves with the terminology and basic skills required to start their first role on board. These can also apply to the maritime services industry and as a foundation for more advanced training courses also available at Galileo Maritime Academy.

The Training Programs

Individual courses start at just 2 days in length, run up to 1 week for a full introductory package and are an excellent way to learn the basics that will be expected of those applying for work on vessels under 24 metres and for work in the maritime services industry.

All courses have a focus on practical hands-on-training and are delivered by the experienced and professional team of instructors at the modern Galileo training campus at Phuket Yacht Haven Marina. 

Deckhand / Engineer Introductory Training • 3 days

This course is designed for those with limited knowledge of marine engineering and who are seeking to have a better understanding of maritime engineering fundamentals and how to carry out basic operating and maintenance procedures on board small vessels.

With the correct knowledge provided through practical training and in a realistic environment, students will gain a better understanding of engines, machinery, equipment and systems on board your vessels. With this knowledge and understanding of basic maintenance, costs for the operator can be reduced and downtime, breakdowns and unplanned stoppages can be controlled or eliminated.

Basic Marine Safety Training • 2 days

For small vessel operators in the marine tourism industry, the strength of their brand and its perceived value relies heavily on the sense of safety and security that comes with it. Galileo have designed this course to assist marine operators in raising the profile of their brand and demonstrating their values by having their crew trained and certified in maritime safety procedures.

This basic safety training is delivered to an international standard by professional instructors and will allow operators to confidently present their marine business to agents, clients and guests as an international standard marine tourism operation, properly prepared for work at sea.

Yacht Crew Basic Skills Training • 2 days

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge, and practical skills that will enable them to begin a career in private or charter yachts that are less than 24 meters in length.

This course has a strong focus on preparing crew to professionally brief international passengers and explain navigation routes, safety requirements, boat layout and helping the crew to confidently handle guests in all situations, including emergencies.

For more information on the above courses or any other maritime training enquiries, drop by the Galileo campus in Phuket Yacht Haven, visit their website at www.galileomaritimeacademy.com or get in touch directly by calling 090 490 7443.

News from Ocean Marina

Late last year, the center for Covid-19 situation administration agreed to allow pleasure yachts to once again enter the Kingdom of Thailand, with two anchorages approved. These are Ao Por, off Phuket, and a position about a ¼ nautical mile off Ocean Marina. Since the rules were approved, three yachts entered The Gulf of Thailand, through Ocean Marina.

The vessel & crew must apply in advance to enter the kingdom through a recognised Thai shipping agent. All crew must have a Certificate of Entry (COE), medical certificate, and health insurance for at least 100,000 US dollars covering Covid-19, and all crew must report their temperature twice daily and undergo 3 separate tests for Covid-19.

 

Vessels must anchor at one of two designated anchorage spots:

  • In the Gulf of Thailand, within 500 metres of position 12°49’24″N 100°54’06 » E. Approximately 0.25 nautical miles to the southwest of the entrance to Ocean Marina in Pattaya.
  • In the Andaman Sea, within 500 metres of position 08°01’30″N 98°29’00 » E. Approximately 1.30 nautical miles to the east of the island of Ko Nakha Noi.

If you would like to move your boat to Ocean Marina, please contact Mr Scott Finsten at 085.248.3216, the Harbour Master at Ocean Marina for more details. There are a number of requirements needed before you leave, so please let us help you.

Ocean Marina also says the local islands are open again after recent restrictions.

Actually, there has never been a better time to visit, and now is the time to get out on the boat. Islands that have normally been full of tourists and previously thought the last place to visit are now the “go-to” islands.

Good spots include Koh Sak is just off Koh Larn, and between Koh Larn and Pattaya. The islands have some amazing coral and white sand beaches. The best anchorage is at the northeastern corner, and be careful of anchoring near the coral. With no tourists, boat owners are finding they are the only ones there. Only a bit over 9nm from Ocean Marina, this is truly a beautiful spot.

Koh Larn is a similar story to Koh Sak, but in addition to the white sand beaches, and the crystal clear water, you also have restaurants, so it is a nice alternative to eating on the boat.

Ocean Marina would also like everyone to know that YRAT is hosting International Umpire Training 2021, it will be conducted in Thai and English, on the 19th – 21st of April at Classic Kameo Hotel in Rayong. Ocean Marina Yacht Club has been invited to join. First in, first, serve.

For more information, call 038.237.300 or email [email protected] (and the Top of the Gulf Regatta has been moved to November with specific dates being announced late in the year).

Simpson Marine very pro-active during COVID era

The Simpson Marine Thailand team celebrated the start of last summer with Phuket’s Summer Boat Show in June.  The event saw 20 yachts on display representing each brand Simpson represents in Asia: SanlorenzoFairline, Beneteau, Lagoon and Aquila. Sailing enthusiasts visited Ao Po Grand Marina to view the yachts and learn about Simpson’s yacht management and charter programmes. The three-day show was the only boat show held in the region since the COVID lockdown and Simpson deserves a lot of credit for carrying it out as the island was on lockdown just a couple weeks before the event.

Models on display included the Sanlorenzo SL78; the Fairline Squadron 50; the Beneteau Gran Turismo 46 & 49; the Beneteau Flyer 8.8; the Lagoon 40, 42,  46, &  52; the Aquila 44; the Seawind 1000 XL2; and the Capelli Tempest 1000.

Then mid-October saw Simpson Marine stage its first brokerage show at Ocean Marina in Pattaya. It is at about this time that Ocean Marina usually stages its own boat show, but COVID-19 but a kibosh on that this year. So Simpson Marine’s Country Manager Howard Prime seized the opportunity and working with Simpson Marine’s Pattaya Sales Manager Russell Hough and Ocean Marina Harbormaster Scott Finsten the three rounded up twelve boats in the marina, including a new Oceanis 6.1, whose owners were looking to sell and staged a brokerage show with Simpson earning a commission if any of the boats were sold.

The show provided guests with good deals on a wide variety of used boats, and with COVID restrictions in place across the globe, this is a great time to rediscover and explore Thailand’s stunning natural topography and anchorages.

The event also served as a launch for Grow Boating Pattaya, a leisure marine networking event that Ocean Marina will stage every month. Grow Boating Phuket has been going for some time now, under the watchful eye of Ian Hewett, and has proved to be a great opportunity for those in the business to mingle, commiserate, and share ideas on how to stimulate the boating industry in the country.

Kudos must go out to Simpson Marine for staging this event. Not only has the company sold 115 boats in 2020 in Asia, but while many companies have become reticent to even venture out of their office during the pandemic Simpson has aggressively staged hygienic safe-distancing events. These include a Sanlorenzo SL78 showing off of Trisara in Phuket and a 16-boat three-day show at Ao Po Grand Marina last summer, hi-lighting to the rest of us that there will be a new normal boating world once COVID-19 is brought under control. It is very easy to get down in the dumps during times like these, but Howard and his enthusiastic staff won’t let us.

Howard says Simpson through the Show also wanted to stress that Pattaya is a competitive boat market and the Top of the Gulf of Thailand has vast potential as a boating destination.

Simpson was also present at the 37th Thailand Motor International Expo (2020), which ran from December 3-16 at the Impact Challenger Arena at Muang Thong Thani. For the first time, the event showcased boats and leisure marine companies through the “Join Boat Platform”.

And Simpson has pitched in to help Peter Jacops and Disabled Sailing Thailand. It sponsors an SV-14 (a boat especially designed for sailors with physical disabilities), which it had on display at both the Ocean Marina Brokerage Show and the Motor Expo.

Simpson Marine is set to launch Asia’s first Simpson Marine Sailing Acasemy in Thailand. Ocean Marina Yacht Club will host the Academy and it will apply Simpson Marine’s passion for yachting to nurture the younger generation in Thailand, giving them a head start into the vibrant marine industry.

Students of Simpson Marine Sailing Academy will be enrolled into the International Yacht and Maritime Training (IYT) curriculum – a globally recognized sailing course. Each student from Simpson Marine Sailing Academy will undertake a top-notch sail training syllabus in a safe and professional environment.

To top it all off at the end of March this year, Simpson premiered the Fairline F//Line 33 at an evening featuring British fine luxury with champagne and canapes. The powerboat was docked at Shangri-La hotel’s pier and invited guests were treated to a special tour aboard this exciting luxury vessel on the Chao Phraya River, with Bangkok’s spectacular horizon providing the backdrop.

If you have any questions in general about Simpson’s operations in Thailand please contact [email protected].

N & J sells Taronga & Rhine

Northrop & Johnson is delighted to announce the sale of the 97-foot (29.72m) TARONGA by Yacht Broker Jim Poulsen.
Northrop & Johnson is also delighted to announce the sale of the 131-foot (40.05m) RHINE by Yacht Brokers Jim Poulsen and Greg Dagge of N&J’s Thailand office, who acted on behalf of the buyer.

TARONGA was designed by the legendary designers at Sparkman & Stephens and was the number six of only 11 Maxi 88s built between 1989 and 2005 at the CIM shipyard in Rochefort, France. The sailing yacht underwent extensive modifications from CIM engineers in 2013/2014 and an exterior and interior refit in 2017, rendering her in superb condition.

This transatlantic cruiser offers both superior comfort and top performance. TARONGA showcases a beautifully handcrafted interior with classic, elegant styling. The luxury yacht’s interior is light and airy, thanks to numerous windows throughout. The sailing yacht’s salon features a large settee on one side and a comfortable sofa opposite. There also is a bar. This layout makes the space ideal for relaxing after a day full of sailing and entertaining guests. The yacht also has a commercial galley, fully equipped for a chef.

Sailing yacht TARONGA offers accommodations for six guests in three nicely appointed staterooms. The sailing yacht features a spacious master stateroom with a private bath as well as two double-bed staterooms. Each guest stateroom has its own bath. In addition, TARONGA has accommodations for three crewmembers in three crew cabins.

On deck, the luxury sailing yacht has an expansive 45-square-meter covered cockpit with two large settees. This is the ideal place to dine alfresco and relax under sail or at anchor. The helm is just forward of the cockpit and well protected from the elements while still providing excellent sight. Further forward is a lovely oversized double seat on the bow, which provides a private escape.

RHINE, on the other hand was built by Sunseeker in 2012, showcases the brand’s iconic ultra-modern profile and esteemed high-quality.

This yacht was built and designed with entertaining in mind. She showcases large sociable areas throughout that are versatile and maximize space, making her perfect for corporate entertaining and hosting dinner parties. The superyacht also features several areas with a more intimate feeling that are ideal for relaxing with the family.

RHINE’s interior is modern with oriental flourishes. The great care and attention in the selection of her furnishings show as they perfectly complement the high-gloss Sapele wood and Emperador marble to create an elevated sense of luxury.

The luxury superyacht welcomes up to eight guests in the superior comfort of four generous staterooms. RHINE showcases a divine full-beam, main deck master suite that is a private oasis complete with its own minibar and fridge. There is also a luxurious VIP stateroom with its own minibar and fridge. The additional staterooms are convertible staterooms, which can be doubles or twins, allowing for guest versatility. Each stateroom onboard is accompanied by an en-suite bath.

The superyacht showcases impressive outdoor living areas. RHINE’s sundeck was designed for versatile entertaining and total relaxation in the utmost luxury. The Sunseeker’s sundeck features a Jacuzzi, ample seating and a bar. The skylounge aft offers alfresco dining, while the main deck aft features additional space for lounging and socializing. RHINE’s aft garage houses a 20-foot (6.2m) Pascoe jet tender and two Jet Skis. The hydraulic swim platform makes this area ideal for enjoying water actives.

New rules for foreign yachts staying in Thailand

The Thai Custom Department has announced a new policy that makes it even more attractive for foreign yachts to stay in the Kingdom. This new announcement extends the temporary import exemption up to 2 years and 6 months and allows Superyacht to charter without collecting VAT on a value of the vessel.

On 23rd February 2021, a meeting was held between Mr. Arkhorm Termpittayapaisith (Ministry of Finance), Mrs. Kobkarn Wattanavarangkul (former Ministry of Sport and Tourism), the Thai Revenue Department, the Thai Custom, and the Thai Yachting Business Association. The meeting was held to discuss the Thai Custom’s new announcement which will make Thailand an even more friendly destination to visiting foreign yachts.

This announcement has changed 2 major policies:

(1) Extending a temporary import exemption to foreign visiting yachts from 6 + 6 months to 6 months + 2 years (a total of 30 months)
(2) Allowing foreign Superyachts with a Thai charter permit to operate without collecting VAT on the value of the vessel. These game changing policies will make Thailand one of the most attractive hubs for yacht and visiting yachts from all over the world.

New Postponement of Singapore Yacht Show

It was just over a year ago that the 10th Anniversary Edition of the Singapore Yacht Show (SYS 2020) was the first of the major international yacht shows to have to postpone its annual event due to the arrival on the global stage of the Covid-19 pandemic. How the world has changed – some think irreversibly – since then…

Exactly six weeks to go to the third scheduled opening, the SYS organizing team at Verventia are devastated to have to share that, on the advice of the show’s major stakeholders, including our principal exhibitors, a decision has been made to postpone what is now effectively SYS 2021 to later in the year.

While the organisers totally accept that the Safe Management Measures still currently imposed on business events in Singapore are necessary and clearly effective, after much deliberation they have concluded that it will be too challenging to stage SYS to the satisfaction of exhibitors and sponsors for the moment.

The consensus of opinion is that the show should be delayed until the advent of the global vaccination programme forces the retreat of the virus and facilitates the re-opening of borders, such that a near-normal SYS – so important for awakening the massive latent yachting market in Asia – can be properly staged. Realistic and practical new dates will be agreed with industry and government stakeholders alike and will be announced as soon as possible.

Verventia CEO Andy Treadwell remains resolutely positive and ever-optimistic: “Obviously this is something that nobody wanted – least of all us, from a commercial point of view. But the same forces that have taken away the shows, freezing marketing budgets and whole businesses like ours, have at the same time created an unprecedented boom in boat sales and a massive uplift in the industry – and, in my view, in its future, especially in Asia. So I don’t think it’s a time for complaining or despairing at all – the whole leisure boating industry, including its supply chains, eco-systems and universes, are currently doing, or will soon be doing, very well indeed out of all this and the undoubted global economic boom that will surely follow.”

As to the future, Treadwell continued: “ We have to slightly re-think our business model, maybe, but everyone I’ve spoken to is totally supportive and wants us to continue developing our plans for the region – which we are doing entirely in consultation with the industry. Thailand’s government have finally rewarded our faith and shown that they believe in this industry and its future, and we believe that the rest of the region will follow suit eventually. We are consolidating the three regional shows and planning major changes in how we operate, so as to keep the boom going in the context of the new norms. We will be making some big announcements soon ! ”

About Verventia Pte Ltd (www.singaporeyachtshow.com) Verventia is a business catalyst, providing sales and marketing platforms for introducing manufacturers and suppliers to distributors and end users, as well as presenting global audiences with new lifestyle products and services. The company’s unique database of yachting and lifestyle industry connections and buyers gleaned from 10 years of organizing events in the sector, combined with its extensive experience in government lobbying, make it an exceptional facilitator of industry growth and business development in the untapped market of Asia. Well-versed in the implementation of successful marketing campaigns, event production and project management, the experienced and professional team at Verventia are fully dedicated to delivering world-class events in unique venues around the world. Verventia’s current portfolio comprises the Singapore, Thailand and Hong Kong Yacht Shows, with several major new projects coming online in 2021/22.

Smart wristbands for yacht tourists

Source : Bangkok Post, March 9, 2021

Digital Economy Promotion Agency (Depa) is working with mobile operator Advanced Info Service (AIS), tourism operators in Phuket as well as a local tech startup to roll out the Digital Yacht Quarantine programme using smart wristbands as a health monitoring tool for tourists during their 14-day quarantine period on the vessels.

The move is meant to help bring 1.8 billion baht in yacht tourism revenue to the country.

« Depa is working with local startups and private firms for this project. Tourism is a key sector where technology can be used to address the problem and boost travel, » said Nuttapon Nimmanphatcharin, president and chief executive of Depa.

Mr Nuttapon said Phuket is one of the smart city projects in Thailand and serves as a magnet tourist attraction. In 2020, Phuket lost revenue of over 320 billion baht as a result of the pandemic, which hampered tourism. In the past three years, Depa has set aside 700 million in assisting over 100 local startups.

AIS is providing Narrow Band Internet of Things (NB-IoT) network under the project and cloud computing services to local partners as part of the solution, said Tanapong Ittisakulchai, chief enterprise business officer at AIS.

This is the first time the NB-IoT service is being provided about 10 kilometres from the shore, he said.

« This technology offers devices battery life of four days and is useful for low data traffic, » he said.

AIS works with PMH Holding (POMO), a monitoring and tracking solution provider; Flow Corporation, a yacht marina operator as well as the Thai Yachting Business Association (TYBA), to operate the project.

Chatchai Tangchittrong, business development of PMH Holding, said the company develops wristband and smartwatches that are trackers and health devices for tourists to wear during 14 days of quarantine on yachts.

The system works accurately with smart sensors to measure tourists’ pulse, blood pressure and temperature. An emergency SOS is sent in the event of any incident and the tourist needs assistance.

The use of the wristband also ensures the safety of tourists as about two tourists disappear from Phuket each month while travelling and it costs 4-5 million baht to search for each person. « We provide digital tracking quarantine for hotels in the Cayman Islands for six hotel bubble projects there, » he said. « We can provide the solution for hotel bubbles in Thailand too. This lets tourists relax more and enjoy hotel facilities and nearby areas. » The pandemic saw the number of tourists on the island plummet from 40,000-50,000 a day to just hundreds.

Tanyuta Singhmanee, managing director of Asia Pacific Superyachts, which represents TYBA, said the pandemic is taking a toll on membership, especially from other countries having reduced customer numbers by 50-60%. The project could boost tourist confidence. Around 100 yachts are expected to take part in the programme this year, bringing in 300-500 tourists to the country.

TYBA • Message

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Fez & Phoenix grab top spots in 24th Bay Regatta

Simon James and Kae Wattana of Regattas Asia did what few people in this region have done: stage two major regattas throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Co-operating with local health authorities the 24th Bay Regatta, and second Bay Regatta since the novel coronavirus outbreak, set sail April 1st from Ao Po Grand Marina.

The Bay Regatta is a series of passage races – an event format that catches the attention of the region’s best sailors as they competed in two classes, Racing Multihulls and Monohulls with a cruising multi (Mojo) thrown in for good measure.

This four-day circumnavigation of Phang Nga Bay focuses on fun. Attracting the serious, the not-so-serious and the not-at-all-serious “racing” sailors, the regatta appeals to those who enjoy the stunning sailing grounds of the area and a different destination each evening.

Each evening, the regatta anchors at a different venue and the sailors go ashore. Those staying ashore –the majority of the fleet – book accommodation and either eat in the local restaurants or enjoy the official event functions which engage with the local community. Most of the expenditure of the regatta goes directly into the local economies of the areas the regatta visits — this has been the case since the regatta was launched and it will remain so for the future — an excellent example of how sports tourism works to the benefit of communities and local economies.

John Coffin’s Fez pulled the surprise of the regatta winning the five-boat Multihull Racing Class with John Newnham’s Twin Sharks coming in second. Twin Sharks had a man overboard on day two, which saw them lose valuable time and finish fourth, which would hurt them later in the overall standings, though thank God crewmate Ken Wottawa was alright (a big shout out to Grenville Fordham who was crewing on Coconuts as they were hot on the heels of Twin Sharks as he managed to alert his squad to avert as Wottawa hit the water).

Dan Fidock’s Fugazi had line honours throughout the regatta but handicap saw them settle for third overall. Alan Carwardine’s Coconuts never recovered from their DNF on the first day and settled for fount overall, while Glywn Rowlands’ Twister 2 took fifth-place in the class. Multihull Performance saw the order shift as follows: Twin Sharks, Fugazi, Fez, Coconuts, Twister 2 & Mojo.

Niels Degenkolw  and Phoenix rode three first-place finishes to victory in the four-boat IRC monohull class allowing the Dane to win this class for the umpteenth time in the Bay Regatta. Fellow Dane Torben Kristensen’s Kinnon was third and it was only Andrew McDermott’s Jessandra, who was able to take a spot away from Phoenix at the top of the podium winning day two of the regatta, allowing them to finish second overall in the class. Paul Merry’s Night Train was fourth. Overall results were the same for the class in the Monohull Performance division.

While Rick Fielding’s Mojo did not finish high in the standings Fielding did show great sportsmanship in ferrying all of Night Train’s crew to shore safely in his dinghy To Ao Nang Beach. He was honoured by PRO Simon James with a bottle of port in memory of the late Marty Rijurkis who made a habit of highlighting good deeds people would perform during regattas. (Port Takola Marina kindly hosted the regatta boats for two nights during the regatta).

Fourth Sailor’s Regatta takes to the water

The fourth annual Sailor’s Regatta organized by the Phuket Yacht Club took sail from March 19th – March 21st with racers competing in four different classes (Racing Monohulls, Multihulls & Platus).

This “no frills” regatta continues to be popular with local sailors, many of whom have been hit hard by the coronavirus. It was almost a year ago that Thailand sealed off its international borders and a few days of fun on the water off of Ao Chalong was a much-needed respite and boost of confidence for club members.

John Newnham’s Twin Sharks edged out Warwick Downes’ Bonza in the prestigious Multihull Racing Class to close out the regatta. The crews finished tied on points (15) but Twin Sharks has more overall victories in the three-day series (three to two) to claim the title. So Newnham’s crew of Olly Wilce, Alf Rowson, and Jason Corall triumphed again despite being a sailor short.

Bonza never fails to draw oohs and aahs in their hull-flying and it was no different in this regatta as the trimaran raced around capturing line honours time and time again. Alan Carwardine’s Coconuts, Hans Rahmann’s Voodoo and the Scott Duncanson-helmed Fugazi rounded out the class finishing in that order.

Alfie Rowson, who recently came out of quarantine after returning from his native Scotland, gave credit to the Race Committee for modifying the courses as the regatta went on responding to the fluctuating wind conditions and directions.

Niels Degenkolw’s Phoenix won all but one race in the four-boat Monohull division capturing the class title followed by Andrew McDermott Jessandra who earned the only other victory in the series. Mike Downard’s Magic finished third and Martyn Henman’s Second Nature finished last with a DNS on race four.

Paul “Flatty” Baker’s four first-place finishes in Pulse Grey enabled Paul and his wife to take the three-boat Cruising Multihull title over Bill Kane’s The Sting and Pulse Red skipped by Simon Boyd, who also sailed with his partner in the regatta.

The Platu division could have been called the “Sail in Asia” division as all three Platus came from Mike Downard’s fleet over in nearby Ao Yon.  Kirsten Durward’s Wolf had four first-place finishes and five second-place finishes to capture the division. Brooke Palmer’s Tiger was second and Jon Oeygard’s The Fox came third, after switching boats after race day one.

Credit to the PYC for staging for staging the event, and PRO Matt McGrath for making sure it ran smoothly.

FRASER Phuket signs on Demarest & Maxxx

FRASER Phuket, operated under license by Asia Marine, has recently signed on two super yachts as Central Agent. Under charter, Demarest, a stunning 105ft Falcon yacht, will be operating overnight charters from Phuket. Under brokerage, Maxxx, a 86ft Sunseeker is now for sale and represents great value for prospective buyers.

East Marine Asia has all your anti-fouling needs

Antifouling, it’s a very important product when it comes to taking care of your boat, but it can have a harmful and deadly effect on sea life. Ian Lok, East Marine Asia’s Sales Manager, says that while people are much more aware of the rubbish they throw in the sea these days antifouling is one of the most toxic substances we put in our oceans and by using improperly mixed antifouling many people in the marine industry are causing more damage to the oceans than they know. As Ian says, any solution designed to remove barnacles from your hull is going to have a toxic make-up.  And the main catalyst in early anti-fouling mixtures was Tributyltin “TBT” a toxic biocide that was extremely effective at cleaning hulls but toxic to the environment and has now been banned.

Wikipedia states, “Tributyltin (TBT) is an umbrella term for a class of organotin compounds which contain the (C4H9)3 Sn group, with a prominent example being tributyltin oxide. For 40 years TBT was used as a biocide in anti-fouling paint, commonly known as bottom paint, applied to the hulls of ocean going vessels. Bottom paint improves ship performance and durability as it reduces the rate of biofouling (the growth of organisms on the ship’s hull). The TBT slowly leaches out into the marine environment where it is highly toxic toward nontarget organisms. TBT is also an obesogen. After it led to collapse of local populations of organisms, TBT was banned.”

There are still shops today that buy and sell TBT as a chemical compound to add to anti-fouling paint. But not only will this foul the environment, if you screw up the mixing ratio, the paint will not adhere to the hull properly. Be very careful of shady contractors that offer you a great price on antifouling.

Yacht-based antifouling tends to be more environmentally-friendly than commercial antifouling, which is designed for offshore ships, ferries and craft that are mainly used offshore with constant medium to high speed. Commercial antifouling is generally a much cheaper coating due to the chemical costs used to produce the product.

Yacht antifoulings are more self polishing and softer. This allows better growth control while not moving, and while underway. As most yachts spend more time stationary on moorings, marinas and hardstands, International yacht antifouling uses Biolux® technology in a variety of their antifouling to give the highest performance with the environment in mind.

With antifouling itself, there are two kinds: hard and eroding as described by International Yacht Paint (AkzoNobel) below:

Hard antifoulings work by releasing biocide from the surface of the coating to deter fouling organisms. Hard antifoulings don’t really wear, but abrasive material in the water such as silt and sand may lead to a very minor reduction in the film build. Biocide leaching rate reduces over the lifetime of the product. After a few seasons, there may be a residual build-up of product that needs to be removed. If you have a fast boat, or a fast boat that is used very regularly, then hard antifouling is usually the best product to choose. Boats moored in fresh water normally use these types as eroding antifoulings are designed to erode in salt water and may not erode sufficiently in fresh water. For those who like to race, hard products are a good option as they can be burnished or wet sanded to a smooth finish prior to racing. Within this group there is type that contains a fluoro micro-additive to help provide a smoother faster film than a standard hard type might otherwise provide. This is favoured by keen racing types who place more importance on keeping their hulls smooth and clean rather than its antifouling performance.

Eroding antifoulings, also known as soft or ablative antifoulings, also work by releasing biocide. However, this type of over antifouling slowly erodes in seawater eventually leaving little or no antifouling on your hull. If you wipe the hull at any time you’ll see a small cloud of product washing away. Overall, they offer very good all-round performance in a wide range of fouling conditions. Eroding antifoulings are great for those who prefer a low maintenance option, as generally speaking there is far less accumulation of old paint on the hull after each season. However, a slow build up can still occur if excessive paint is applied at each application. This will eventually need to be removed as it may become unstable and lead to problems when new antifouling is applied.

To get more information on what antifouling is best for you, drop in to East Marine Asia’s chandlery at Boat Lagoon Phuket, or contact Ian at [email protected]

Other East Marine Asia Green Initiatives

East Marine Asia is no longer providing plastic bags. The company has launched a campaign whereby you get Bt20 off any purchase over Bt200 if you are bring in an East Marine Asia eco-bag to carry away your purchases.

The company is also trying to get customers to start using electronic catalogues and do their browsing online to get away from using paper catalogues.

East Marine Asia is doing its best but it is dealing with an industry that produces so much waste. The use of bubble wrap alone is a major concern, so the company is experimenting with bio-degradable bubble wrap. And in the future, it will also use only recycled/compostable packaging material for its shipping needs.

The company also aims to minimize the number of paper receipts and invoices it issues, unless specifically requested by the customer. It will begin emailing out the invoices and receipts instead.

www. eastmarineasia.com

Galileo Maritime Academy Introductory Maritime Courses

Galileo Maritime Academy is proud to announce the launch of a new range of introductory courses taught by professional, internationally certified instructors at their world class training facility located in Phuket Yacht Haven Marina.

As a professional seafarer training facility providing international qualifications for crew to work on board large vessels, Galileo understands that there are also those who lack experience and basic skills necessary to be able to take the most away from their MCA and Superyacht Career Entry courses.

So they have developed the following courses to help new entrants to the maritime industry familiarise themselves with the terminology and basic skills required to start their first role on board. These can also apply to the maritime services industry and as a foundation for more advanced training courses also available at Galileo Maritime Academy.

The Training Programs

Individual courses start at just 2 days in length, run up to 1 week for a full introductory package and are an excellent way to learn the basics that will be expected of those applying for work on vessels under 24 metres and for work in the maritime services industry.

All courses have a focus on practical hands-on-training and are delivered by the experienced and professional team of instructors at the modern Galileo training campus at Phuket Yacht Haven Marina. 

Deckhand / Engineer Introductory Training • 3 days

This course is designed for those with limited knowledge of marine engineering and who are seeking to have a better understanding of maritime engineering fundamentals and how to carry out basic operating and maintenance procedures on board small vessels.

With the correct knowledge provided through practical training and in a realistic environment, students will gain a better understanding of engines, machinery, equipment and systems on board your vessels. With this knowledge and understanding of basic maintenance, costs for the operator can be reduced and downtime, breakdowns and unplanned stoppages can be controlled or eliminated.

Basic Marine Safety Training • 2 days

For small vessel operators in the marine tourism industry, the strength of their brand and its perceived value relies heavily on the sense of safety and security that comes with it. Galileo have designed this course to assist marine operators in raising the profile of their brand and demonstrating their values by having their crew trained and certified in maritime safety procedures.

This basic safety training is delivered to an international standard by professional instructors and will allow operators to confidently present their marine business to agents, clients and guests as an international standard marine tourism operation, properly prepared for work at sea.

Yacht Crew Basic Skills Training • 2 days

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge, and practical skills that will enable them to begin a career in private or charter yachts that are less than 24 meters in length.

This course has a strong focus on preparing crew to professionally brief international passengers and explain navigation routes, safety requirements, boat layout and helping the crew to confidently handle guests in all situations, including emergencies.

For more information on the above courses or any other maritime training enquiries, drop by the Galileo campus in Phuket Yacht Haven, visit their website at www.galileomaritimeacademy.com or get in touch directly by calling 090 490 7443.

News from Ocean Marina

Late last year, the center for Covid-19 situation administration agreed to allow pleasure yachts to once again enter the Kingdom of Thailand, with two anchorages approved. These are Ao Por, off Phuket, and a position about a ¼ nautical mile off Ocean Marina. Since the rules were approved, three yachts entered The Gulf of Thailand, through Ocean Marina.

The vessel & crew must apply in advance to enter the kingdom through a recognised Thai shipping agent. All crew must have a Certificate of Entry (COE), medical certificate, and health insurance for at least 100,000 US dollars covering Covid-19, and all crew must report their temperature twice daily and undergo 3 separate tests for Covid-19.

 

Vessels must anchor at one of two designated anchorage spots:

  • In the Gulf of Thailand, within 500 metres of position 12°49’24″N 100°54’06 » E. Approximately 0.25 nautical miles to the southwest of the entrance to Ocean Marina in Pattaya.
  • In the Andaman Sea, within 500 metres of position 08°01’30″N 98°29’00 » E. Approximately 1.30 nautical miles to the east of the island of Ko Nakha Noi.

If you would like to move your boat to Ocean Marina, please contact Mr Scott Finsten at 085.248.3216, the Harbour Master at Ocean Marina for more details. There are a number of requirements needed before you leave, so please let us help you.

Ocean Marina also says the local islands are open again after recent restrictions.

Actually, there has never been a better time to visit, and now is the time to get out on the boat. Islands that have normally been full of tourists and previously thought the last place to visit are now the “go-to” islands.

Good spots include Koh Sak is just off Koh Larn, and between Koh Larn and Pattaya. The islands have some amazing coral and white sand beaches. The best anchorage is at the northeastern corner, and be careful of anchoring near the coral. With no tourists, boat owners are finding they are the only ones there. Only a bit over 9nm from Ocean Marina, this is truly a beautiful spot.

Koh Larn is a similar story to Koh Sak, but in addition to the white sand beaches, and the crystal clear water, you also have restaurants, so it is a nice alternative to eating on the boat.

Ocean Marina would also like everyone to know that YRAT is hosting International Umpire Training 2021, it will be conducted in Thai and English, on the 19th – 21st of April at Classic Kameo Hotel in Rayong. Ocean Marina Yacht Club has been invited to join. First in, first, serve.

For more information, call 038.237.300 or email [email protected] (and the Top of the Gulf Regatta has been moved to November with specific dates being announced late in the year).

Simpson Marine very pro-active during COVID era

The Simpson Marine Thailand team celebrated the start of last summer with Phuket’s Summer Boat Show in June.  The event saw 20 yachts on display representing each brand Simpson represents in Asia: SanlorenzoFairline, Beneteau, Lagoon and Aquila. Sailing enthusiasts visited Ao Po Grand Marina to view the yachts and learn about Simpson’s yacht management and charter programmes. The three-day show was the only boat show held in the region since the COVID lockdown and Simpson deserves a lot of credit for carrying it out as the island was on lockdown just a couple weeks before the event.

Models on display included the Sanlorenzo SL78; the Fairline Squadron 50; the Beneteau Gran Turismo 46 & 49; the Beneteau Flyer 8.8; the Lagoon 40, 42,  46, &  52; the Aquila 44; the Seawind 1000 XL2; and the Capelli Tempest 1000.

Then mid-October saw Simpson Marine stage its first brokerage show at Ocean Marina in Pattaya. It is at about this time that Ocean Marina usually stages its own boat show, but COVID-19 but a kibosh on that this year. So Simpson Marine’s Country Manager Howard Prime seized the opportunity and working with Simpson Marine’s Pattaya Sales Manager Russell Hough and Ocean Marina Harbormaster Scott Finsten the three rounded up twelve boats in the marina, including a new Oceanis 6.1, whose owners were looking to sell and staged a brokerage show with Simpson earning a commission if any of the boats were sold.

The show provided guests with good deals on a wide variety of used boats, and with COVID restrictions in place across the globe, this is a great time to rediscover and explore Thailand’s stunning natural topography and anchorages.

The event also served as a launch for Grow Boating Pattaya, a leisure marine networking event that Ocean Marina will stage every month. Grow Boating Phuket has been going for some time now, under the watchful eye of Ian Hewett, and has proved to be a great opportunity for those in the business to mingle, commiserate, and share ideas on how to stimulate the boating industry in the country.

Kudos must go out to Simpson Marine for staging this event. Not only has the company sold 115 boats in 2020 in Asia, but while many companies have become reticent to even venture out of their office during the pandemic Simpson has aggressively staged hygienic safe-distancing events. These include a Sanlorenzo SL78 showing off of Trisara in Phuket and a 16-boat three-day show at Ao Po Grand Marina last summer, hi-lighting to the rest of us that there will be a new normal boating world once COVID-19 is brought under control. It is very easy to get down in the dumps during times like these, but Howard and his enthusiastic staff won’t let us.

Howard says Simpson through the Show also wanted to stress that Pattaya is a competitive boat market and the Top of the Gulf of Thailand has vast potential as a boating destination.

Simpson was also present at the 37th Thailand Motor International Expo (2020), which ran from December 3-16 at the Impact Challenger Arena at Muang Thong Thani. For the first time, the event showcased boats and leisure marine companies through the “Join Boat Platform”.

And Simpson has pitched in to help Peter Jacops and Disabled Sailing Thailand. It sponsors an SV-14 (a boat especially designed for sailors with physical disabilities), which it had on display at both the Ocean Marina Brokerage Show and the Motor Expo.

Simpson Marine is set to launch Asia’s first Simpson Marine Sailing Acasemy in Thailand. Ocean Marina Yacht Club will host the Academy and it will apply Simpson Marine’s passion for yachting to nurture the younger generation in Thailand, giving them a head start into the vibrant marine industry.

Students of Simpson Marine Sailing Academy will be enrolled into the International Yacht and Maritime Training (IYT) curriculum – a globally recognized sailing course. Each student from Simpson Marine Sailing Academy will undertake a top-notch sail training syllabus in a safe and professional environment.

To top it all off at the end of March this year, Simpson premiered the Fairline F//Line 33 at an evening featuring British fine luxury with champagne and canapes. The powerboat was docked at Shangri-La hotel’s pier and invited guests were treated to a special tour aboard this exciting luxury vessel on the Chao Phraya River, with Bangkok’s spectacular horizon providing the backdrop.

If you have any questions in general about Simpson’s operations in Thailand please contact [email protected].

N & J sells Taronga & Rhine

Northrop & Johnson is delighted to announce the sale of the 97-foot (29.72m) TARONGA by Yacht Broker Jim Poulsen.
Northrop & Johnson is also delighted to announce the sale of the 131-foot (40.05m) RHINE by Yacht Brokers Jim Poulsen and Greg Dagge of N&J’s Thailand office, who acted on behalf of the buyer.

TARONGA was designed by the legendary designers at Sparkman & Stephens and was the number six of only 11 Maxi 88s built between 1989 and 2005 at the CIM shipyard in Rochefort, France. The sailing yacht underwent extensive modifications from CIM engineers in 2013/2014 and an exterior and interior refit in 2017, rendering her in superb condition.

This transatlantic cruiser offers both superior comfort and top performance. TARONGA showcases a beautifully handcrafted interior with classic, elegant styling. The luxury yacht’s interior is light and airy, thanks to numerous windows throughout. The sailing yacht’s salon features a large settee on one side and a comfortable sofa opposite. There also is a bar. This layout makes the space ideal for relaxing after a day full of sailing and entertaining guests. The yacht also has a commercial galley, fully equipped for a chef.

Sailing yacht TARONGA offers accommodations for six guests in three nicely appointed staterooms. The sailing yacht features a spacious master stateroom with a private bath as well as two double-bed staterooms. Each guest stateroom has its own bath. In addition, TARONGA has accommodations for three crewmembers in three crew cabins.

On deck, the luxury sailing yacht has an expansive 45-square-meter covered cockpit with two large settees. This is the ideal place to dine alfresco and relax under sail or at anchor. The helm is just forward of the cockpit and well protected from the elements while still providing excellent sight. Further forward is a lovely oversized double seat on the bow, which provides a private escape.

RHINE, on the other hand was built by Sunseeker in 2012, showcases the brand’s iconic ultra-modern profile and esteemed high-quality.

This yacht was built and designed with entertaining in mind. She showcases large sociable areas throughout that are versatile and maximize space, making her perfect for corporate entertaining and hosting dinner parties. The superyacht also features several areas with a more intimate feeling that are ideal for relaxing with the family.

RHINE’s interior is modern with oriental flourishes. The great care and attention in the selection of her furnishings show as they perfectly complement the high-gloss Sapele wood and Emperador marble to create an elevated sense of luxury.

The luxury superyacht welcomes up to eight guests in the superior comfort of four generous staterooms. RHINE showcases a divine full-beam, main deck master suite that is a private oasis complete with its own minibar and fridge. There is also a luxurious VIP stateroom with its own minibar and fridge. The additional staterooms are convertible staterooms, which can be doubles or twins, allowing for guest versatility. Each stateroom onboard is accompanied by an en-suite bath.

The superyacht showcases impressive outdoor living areas. RHINE’s sundeck was designed for versatile entertaining and total relaxation in the utmost luxury. The Sunseeker’s sundeck features a Jacuzzi, ample seating and a bar. The skylounge aft offers alfresco dining, while the main deck aft features additional space for lounging and socializing. RHINE’s aft garage houses a 20-foot (6.2m) Pascoe jet tender and two Jet Skis. The hydraulic swim platform makes this area ideal for enjoying water actives.

New rules for foreign yachts staying in Thailand

The Thai Custom Department has announced a new policy that makes it even more attractive for foreign yachts to stay in the Kingdom. This new announcement extends the temporary import exemption up to 2 years and 6 months and allows Superyacht to charter without collecting VAT on a value of the vessel.

On 23rd February 2021, a meeting was held between Mr. Arkhorm Termpittayapaisith (Ministry of Finance), Mrs. Kobkarn Wattanavarangkul (former Ministry of Sport and Tourism), the Thai Revenue Department, the Thai Custom, and the Thai Yachting Business Association. The meeting was held to discuss the Thai Custom’s new announcement which will make Thailand an even more friendly destination to visiting foreign yachts.

This announcement has changed 2 major policies:

(1) Extending a temporary import exemption to foreign visiting yachts from 6 + 6 months to 6 months + 2 years (a total of 30 months)
(2) Allowing foreign Superyachts with a Thai charter permit to operate without collecting VAT on the value of the vessel. These game changing policies will make Thailand one of the most attractive hubs for yacht and visiting yachts from all over the world.

New Postponement of Singapore Yacht Show

It was just over a year ago that the 10th Anniversary Edition of the Singapore Yacht Show (SYS 2020) was the first of the major international yacht shows to have to postpone its annual event due to the arrival on the global stage of the Covid-19 pandemic. How the world has changed – some think irreversibly – since then…

Exactly six weeks to go to the third scheduled opening, the SYS organizing team at Verventia are devastated to have to share that, on the advice of the show’s major stakeholders, including our principal exhibitors, a decision has been made to postpone what is now effectively SYS 2021 to later in the year.

While the organisers totally accept that the Safe Management Measures still currently imposed on business events in Singapore are necessary and clearly effective, after much deliberation they have concluded that it will be too challenging to stage SYS to the satisfaction of exhibitors and sponsors for the moment.

The consensus of opinion is that the show should be delayed until the advent of the global vaccination programme forces the retreat of the virus and facilitates the re-opening of borders, such that a near-normal SYS – so important for awakening the massive latent yachting market in Asia – can be properly staged. Realistic and practical new dates will be agreed with industry and government stakeholders alike and will be announced as soon as possible.

Verventia CEO Andy Treadwell remains resolutely positive and ever-optimistic: “Obviously this is something that nobody wanted – least of all us, from a commercial point of view. But the same forces that have taken away the shows, freezing marketing budgets and whole businesses like ours, have at the same time created an unprecedented boom in boat sales and a massive uplift in the industry – and, in my view, in its future, especially in Asia. So I don’t think it’s a time for complaining or despairing at all – the whole leisure boating industry, including its supply chains, eco-systems and universes, are currently doing, or will soon be doing, very well indeed out of all this and the undoubted global economic boom that will surely follow.”

As to the future, Treadwell continued: “ We have to slightly re-think our business model, maybe, but everyone I’ve spoken to is totally supportive and wants us to continue developing our plans for the region – which we are doing entirely in consultation with the industry. Thailand’s government have finally rewarded our faith and shown that they believe in this industry and its future, and we believe that the rest of the region will follow suit eventually. We are consolidating the three regional shows and planning major changes in how we operate, so as to keep the boom going in the context of the new norms. We will be making some big announcements soon ! ”

About Verventia Pte Ltd (www.singaporeyachtshow.com) Verventia is a business catalyst, providing sales and marketing platforms for introducing manufacturers and suppliers to distributors and end users, as well as presenting global audiences with new lifestyle products and services. The company’s unique database of yachting and lifestyle industry connections and buyers gleaned from 10 years of organizing events in the sector, combined with its extensive experience in government lobbying, make it an exceptional facilitator of industry growth and business development in the untapped market of Asia. Well-versed in the implementation of successful marketing campaigns, event production and project management, the experienced and professional team at Verventia are fully dedicated to delivering world-class events in unique venues around the world. Verventia’s current portfolio comprises the Singapore, Thailand and Hong Kong Yacht Shows, with several major new projects coming online in 2021/22.

Smart wristbands for yacht tourists

Source : Bangkok Post, March 9, 2021

Digital Economy Promotion Agency (Depa) is working with mobile operator Advanced Info Service (AIS), tourism operators in Phuket as well as a local tech startup to roll out the Digital Yacht Quarantine programme using smart wristbands as a health monitoring tool for tourists during their 14-day quarantine period on the vessels.

The move is meant to help bring 1.8 billion baht in yacht tourism revenue to the country.

« Depa is working with local startups and private firms for this project. Tourism is a key sector where technology can be used to address the problem and boost travel, » said Nuttapon Nimmanphatcharin, president and chief executive of Depa.

Mr Nuttapon said Phuket is one of the smart city projects in Thailand and serves as a magnet tourist attraction. In 2020, Phuket lost revenue of over 320 billion baht as a result of the pandemic, which hampered tourism. In the past three years, Depa has set aside 700 million in assisting over 100 local startups.

AIS is providing Narrow Band Internet of Things (NB-IoT) network under the project and cloud computing services to local partners as part of the solution, said Tanapong Ittisakulchai, chief enterprise business officer at AIS.

This is the first time the NB-IoT service is being provided about 10 kilometres from the shore, he said.

« This technology offers devices battery life of four days and is useful for low data traffic, » he said.

AIS works with PMH Holding (POMO), a monitoring and tracking solution provider; Flow Corporation, a yacht marina operator as well as the Thai Yachting Business Association (TYBA), to operate the project.

Chatchai Tangchittrong, business development of PMH Holding, said the company develops wristband and smartwatches that are trackers and health devices for tourists to wear during 14 days of quarantine on yachts.

The system works accurately with smart sensors to measure tourists’ pulse, blood pressure and temperature. An emergency SOS is sent in the event of any incident and the tourist needs assistance.

The use of the wristband also ensures the safety of tourists as about two tourists disappear from Phuket each month while travelling and it costs 4-5 million baht to search for each person. « We provide digital tracking quarantine for hotels in the Cayman Islands for six hotel bubble projects there, » he said. « We can provide the solution for hotel bubbles in Thailand too. This lets tourists relax more and enjoy hotel facilities and nearby areas. » The pandemic saw the number of tourists on the island plummet from 40,000-50,000 a day to just hundreds.

Tanyuta Singhmanee, managing director of Asia Pacific Superyachts, which represents TYBA, said the pandemic is taking a toll on membership, especially from other countries having reduced customer numbers by 50-60%. The project could boost tourist confidence. Around 100 yachts are expected to take part in the programme this year, bringing in 300-500 tourists to the country.